SOLDIER’S PROFILE
Vogel,
Edgar M

December 9, 1920 — January 1, 1961

Army

1811th Ordnance Company

Theater of Operation: Pacific, New Guinea

SOLDIER DETAILS

Served: August 19, 1942 — January 12, 1946

Killed in Action: No

Commissioned: Select One

Military Honors: Asiatic Pacific Service Medal, Philippine Liberation Ribbon, World War II Victory Medal, and the Good Conduct Medal. He also received the Marksman M1 Rifle and the Sharpshooter M'03 Carbine Rifle awards

Prisoner of War: Select One

Gender: Male

Birthplace

KS, Stuttgart

Edgar and his four brothers---Richard, Howard, John, and Edwin----and his four sisters---Edna, Lula, Leona, and Margaret---were born in Phillips County, KS. Their parents were John H. and Margaret Veeh Vogel. The family farmed and they lived at the north end of Chicago Avenue in Stuttgart. The house was white and the big barn was red. Across the unpaved avenue was the school and playground. Edgar's maternal grandfather, George Veeh, had walked west from Marshall County with two other men to have his own land in Phillips County, KS. The family's favorite pets were Schnaps, a dachshund, and Pearly, an Indian pony. Edgar was inducted on August 19, 1942 at Denver, CO. He served with the 1811th Ordnance Company and his military decorations include the Asiatic Pacific Service Medal, Philippine Liberation Ribbon, World War II Victory Medal, and the Good Conduct Medal. He also received the Marksman M1 Rifle and the Sharpshooter M'03 Carbine Rifle awards. Edgar attended a Motor Mechanic Course at Ft. Crook, NE and earned a Driver & Mechanic Badge. Crossing the equator on 2 August 1943, aboard the U.S.A.T. Willard A. Holbrook he became a "Trusty Shellback." He served in New Guinea as an Automotive Mechanic, obtaining the rank of Tec 4. On the long trip home, he was at sea on Christmas Day in 1945. The next day he was initiated into the "Domain of the Golden Dragon: Ruler of the 180th Meridian" aboard the S.S. Carlos Carrillo in latitude 30 degrees 16' N longitude 177 degrees 58'W. He had left Manila on that ship, and his troop ship sailed under the Golden Gate, passed Alcatraz, and docked at a pier in San Francisco on 6 January 1946. He was separated from service six days later at Fort Logan, CO. Edgar was the best baseball player in his athletic family. He farmed and had an implement business (Massey-Harris) in Phillipsburg. The cousins remember him as wearing a white tee shirt and khaki slacks when they visited. He loved to play catch with his nephews and nieces, and he had a big dimple in his chin. Edgar died in 1961, and he is buried in the cemetery just east of Stuttgart, as are his parents and many relatives. His picture, taken with his parents, hangs in the gallery at the Dole Institute of Politics in Lawrence, KS. Edgar is honored by his nieces and nephews: Virginia Ann, James, Robert, Stanley, Karen, Patricia, Peggy, Douglas, Alan, Carol, Richard, Randy, Nancy, Jerry, Larry, Don, Dale, Steve, Jane, and Warren.

This submission is honored by: His many nieces and nephews